A Kind Heart: Heartworm Disease Prevention

Heartworm disease can seriously damage pet healthDo you hear that buzzing in your ear? It’s the annoying sound of a mosquito, all too common at this time of year. But did you know that mosquito bites, although irritating to you, pose a significant health threat to your pets?

Heartworm disease is on the rise, and with over 1 million dogs now infected in the US, it’s important to get the facts on this risk to our pet’s longevity. The Pet’s Place Animal Hospital wants to make sure our readers are aware of the risks of this deadly disease, and the importance of year round prevention.

What is heartworm?

Heartworm is a type of roundworm that infects dogs, cats, and wildlife via the bite of an infected mosquito. Adult heartworms live in the heart and pulmonary arteries of infected animals, and cause significant damage to these organs and other body systems. If left untreated, heartworm infection leads to the animal’s death. Continue…

Microchip Your Pet! It’s Easy, Effective, and Reliable

It's important to pet safety that you microchip your petThere are dozens of insurance policies out there, and we spend hours researching plans for different things in our life. For pet owners, there’s also pet insurance available to guard against an emergency, illness, or accidental injury. However, one of the most important things you can do to prepare for the unknown is to microchip your pet.

Won’t That Hurt?

Some owners are concerned about pain, but microchipping is similar to receiving a routine vaccination. Anesthesia is not required, although some pets receive their microchip at the same time as their spay/neuter surgery.

During a routine wellness visit, we can preload the chip into a sterile applicator and inject it between the shoulder blades (just beneath the layer of loose skin). In some pets, you can feel a small bump, but it doesn’t bother them at all. Continue…

Summer Pet Safety: What’s Good, Better, and Best

This time of year, we spend a lot of time tending to the yard and garden, planning vacations or family gatherings, and attending various parades, events, or concerts, but where in all of this does the family pet stand? In the seasonal hubbub, pets can either seem more underfoot than usual, or they could find themselves a bit lonely while everyone goes in different directions. In case your summer pet safety tactics need a refresher, we offer some seasonally relevant tips and tricks.

Step One: The Bugs

Protecting your pet from internal and external parasites is a job all year long, but because these reach peak numbers in the heat and humidity, it’s absolutely critical that your pet isn’t exposed. Mosquitoes spread heartworm disease, fleas cause a lot of pain, frustration, and intolerable skin reactions, and ticks are responsible for the spread of Lyme disease (among others). Continue…

Abundant Bugs: Not the Time for Willy-Nilly Parasite Prevention

parasite preventionA single female flea can produce an average of 50 eggs per day. Microscopic larvae hatch within days, spin a cocoon two weeks later, and become pupae for up to an entire year. When the temperature is just right, adult fleas emerge and seek a blood meal. Ticks have a four-stage life cycle that requires 3 different hosts to complete. Adult female ticks breed while on a host, then fall to the ground to lay thousands of eggs. These hatch into the larval stage, 8-legged nymphs, and then molt into adults within a relatively short amount of time.

As we enter the peak season for such pests, it remains critically important to guard against potential diseases and health concerns via proactive parasite prevention.

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Beware the Fronds: Palm Toxicity in Pets

palmSpring is just around the corner, and for many of us, that means that garden and landscape planning has begun in earnest. Whether you are an avid vegetable gardener or ornamentals is your thing, the onset of warmer weather is a truly exciting time.

Pet owners have more to think about than simply what and where to plant our vegetables, flowers, and greenery. Many plants commonly found in and around the outside of our homes can pose a risk of poisoning to our furry friends, including the popular sago palm. Sago palm toxicity in pets is a serious problem, but education and prevention can keep your pet safe.

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The Bite that Burns: Rattlesnake Safety for Pets

rattlesnake safety for petsHere in California, snakes are a part of life. Thankfully, many of our native species are harmless, albeit a little disconcerting to find unexpectedly. We do, however, host several species that we need to be on the lookout for in order to keep our families safe.

The Pets Place Animal Hospital knows that rattlesnakes and pets are not a good mix, and pet owners need to know how to prevent problems and handle the situation should an exposure occur. Rattlesnake safety for pets is an essential part of responsible animal ownership in this region.

Why a Bite Matters

Rattlesnake bites can have some very serious consequences. Many times, a bite is “dry”, meaning that no venom is injected into the bite recipient. If the snake injects its venom into the tissues during the strike, though, it begins a serious reaction in the local tissues. Rattlesnake venom disrupts the normal structure of blood vessels leading to severe swelling, blood loss, and shock.

In most cases with pets, we don’t witness the bite or even exposure to the snake. This means that it is up to us to recognize signs that a bite may have occurred and act quickly.

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