Holiday pet safety.

The holiday season is fast upon us, and for many families that means it’s time to dust off all those boxes of seasonal decor. 

Maybe it’s a collection of ceramic pumpkins, tinsel, or Christmas tree lights?  Maybe it’s that cheesy and somehow terrifying scarecrow your partner insists belongs by the front door? Anyway, the point is, to make sure your fun and festive decorations don’t unnecessarily put your pet in harm’s way. 

Candles

From fragrant pumpkin spiced candles to beautiful menorahs, nothing quite sets the holiday mood quite like warm candlelight. Unfortunately, veterinarians see pets every holiday season with burned whiskers and singed tails. Take extra care to place any candles in areas where your curious pet can’t accidentally knock them over or injure themselves. Battery powered candles are a good alternative in these areas. 

Climbing Hazards

What has four paws and loves Christmas trees? Your cat. Probably your dog too. Of course cats love Christmas trees; look at all those sweet climbing limbs and shiny bobbles that need smacking. 

Properly anchoring your tree into the stand will help prevent it from falling over if your cat decides to go for a climb. 

Glass ornaments may not be a good idea if you have a particularly rambunctious cat or a happy dog with a swinging tail. If you have some beautiful glass or delicate ornaments you just can’t live without, it might be a good idea to hang them above tail and sniffing level. Ceramic or glass pumpkins can also be a problem if they’re placed in an area where they can easily be knocked over by a curious or excited pet.

Stringing Danger

Stringed lights and extension cords can cause real trouble for our furry friends. They can easily become entangled or even strangulate themselves on loose cords or excess string lights. Pets who chew also run the risk of electric shock. Make sure to use precautions and keep lights out of your pets’ reach. 

Make sure you keep your pets from drinking any water from the tree stand. Standing water can be a host to bacteria that may give your pets GI issues. 

Tinsel is as irresistible to cats, and they have a tendency to swallow the tinsel, potentially leading to bowel obstruction. 

Botanical Threats

If you have pets who chew plants, it’s best to avoid ornamental holiday varieties like poinsettias, holly, and mistletoe. Chewing these plants can potentially give your pet serious gastrointestinal problems. If you think your pet has ingested a toxic plant consult your veterinarian immediately. 

To learn more and schedule a dog wellness visit, call us at (951) 684-2181 for an appointment. Our staff at The Pets Place Animal Hospital  are here to take care of your pet and answer your questions.