BOOM! CRACK! POP! SIZZLE! SCREAM! Understanding Pet Noise Anxiety This Summer

Most people look forward to summer firework shows and thunderstorms, but their pets may have other opinions. Sure, you might see some pets at different inland empire events this summer, but it’s unlikely that every single one of them will feel relaxed and happy to be there. Pet noise anxiety can be overwhelming, but it can also sneak up on unsuspecting pet owners in search of a good time.

Helping you support your pet’s health and safety is our top priority. Our go-to tips aim to help you prepare for the coming assault on your pet’s mood and wellbeing.

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Pet Poisoning Prevention: What Every Pet Owner Needs To Know

We do so much to make sure our pets are healthy and safe, but is poison proofing our homes one of them? Once we take a good look around, the amount of products we have in our homes that can sicken or a kill a pet can be downright frightening.

Just because your pet has never investigated the houseplants, cleaning products, or the contents of your purse or bathroom cabinets doesn’t mean they won’t in the future. March is National Poison Awareness Month, and what better time to address the serious issue of accidental pet poisoning and how to prevent it in your home.

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Hospital Lobby Etiquette: Safety First

A little kitty in the arms of its personIn the veterinary world, the hospital lobby can be a very busy place! It’s always fun to see our clients – new and established – come through our doors, and sometimes, we have many pets and people waiting to see us. Since safety is always a top priority, we want to offer some tips for proper lobby etiquette.

Safety and Lobby Etiquette

There are a few things that dramatically increase your pet’s safety in the lobby. Pets can be under a lot of stress in new environments, and the smells and sounds of a veterinary hospital make it one of the most stressful environments they encounter. While we take measures to help alleviate stress during exams, we also need your help. Lobby etiquette is for the safety and comfort of all our patients and clients. Continue…

Microchip Your Pet! It’s Easy, Effective, and Reliable

It's important to pet safety that you microchip your petThere are dozens of insurance policies out there, and we spend hours researching plans for different things in our life. For pet owners, there’s also pet insurance available to guard against an emergency, illness, or accidental injury. However, one of the most important things you can do to prepare for the unknown is to microchip your pet.

Won’t That Hurt?

Some owners are concerned about pain, but microchipping is similar to receiving a routine vaccination. Anesthesia is not required, although some pets receive their microchip at the same time as their spay/neuter surgery.

During a routine wellness visit, we can preload the chip into a sterile applicator and inject it between the shoulder blades (just beneath the layer of loose skin). In some pets, you can feel a small bump, but it doesn’t bother them at all. Continue…

Summer Pet Safety: What’s Good, Better, and Best

This time of year, we spend a lot of time tending to the yard and garden, planning vacations or family gatherings, and attending various parades, events, or concerts, but where in all of this does the family pet stand? In the seasonal hubbub, pets can either seem more underfoot than usual, or they could find themselves a bit lonely while everyone goes in different directions. In case your summer pet safety tactics need a refresher, we offer some seasonally relevant tips and tricks.

Step One: The Bugs

Protecting your pet from internal and external parasites is a job all year long, but because these reach peak numbers in the heat and humidity, it’s absolutely critical that your pet isn’t exposed. Mosquitoes spread heartworm disease, fleas cause a lot of pain, frustration, and intolerable skin reactions, and ticks are responsible for the spread of Lyme disease (among others). Continue…

Abundant Bugs: Not the Time for Willy-Nilly Parasite Prevention

parasite preventionA single female flea can produce an average of 50 eggs per day. Microscopic larvae hatch within days, spin a cocoon two weeks later, and become pupae for up to an entire year. When the temperature is just right, adult fleas emerge and seek a blood meal. Ticks have a four-stage life cycle that requires 3 different hosts to complete. Adult female ticks breed while on a host, then fall to the ground to lay thousands of eggs. These hatch into the larval stage, 8-legged nymphs, and then molt into adults within a relatively short amount of time.

As we enter the peak season for such pests, it remains critically important to guard against potential diseases and health concerns via proactive parasite prevention.

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Beware the Fronds: Palm Toxicity in Pets

palmSpring is just around the corner, and for many of us, that means that garden and landscape planning has begun in earnest. Whether you are an avid vegetable gardener or ornamentals is your thing, the onset of warmer weather is a truly exciting time.

Pet owners have more to think about than simply what and where to plant our vegetables, flowers, and greenery. Many plants commonly found in and around the outside of our homes can pose a risk of poisoning to our furry friends, including the popular sago palm. Sago palm toxicity in pets is a serious problem, but education and prevention can keep your pet safe.

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She Ate What?! Foreign Body Surgery in Pets

Can you believe what your pet will eat? They aren’t picky eaters, that’s for sure! In fact, it’s common for pets to eat toys, string, articles of clothing, and even sticks or rocks. This dietary indiscretion can be more than just strange and annoying, though. If objects can’t pass through the digestive tract, they can cause obstruction, perforation, and even death.

A foreign body surgery is an emergency procedure to remove an object that’s obstructing normal digestive function. Luckily, The Pets Place Animal Hospital is here with tips on what to do if your pet samples something they shouldn’t.

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The Most Wonderful Gift of All: Helping Shelter Pets this Holiday Season

helping shelter petsIf you love a pet, there are so many reasons to give thanks for them. Their unconditional love, endless enthusiasm, and happy companionship are only starters when it comes to the gifts pets bestow upon those who love them. In fact, you and your pet may have just about everything you need to stay content, cozy, and well.

This year, why not share the blessings you and your pet enjoy with shelter pets! Helping shelter pets can go a long way in making these deserving pets happy and healthy. And there are so many ways you can lend a hand! Check out some of these great and meaningful ways to spend the holidays.

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Top of the Wishlist: Holiday Pet Safety You Can Count On

The weeks between Halloween and New Year’s are arguably the most meaningful, dazzling, and fun, but that doesn’t mean we get to simply sit around and watch the holidays go by. Instead, we’re all booked solid with parties, shopping, gift exchanges, and cookie swaps. In the midst of all this frenzy, what is a pet to do with themselves? Without a proper nod to holiday pet safety, they could find themselves in danger.

First, the Food

The spotlight during the holidays is, of course, aimed at the endless varieties of food covering every possible surface. Many pets ignore the sheer volume of goodies, while others are overwhelmed with all there is to see, smell, and sample.

The foundation for all other holiday pet safety hinges on food awareness. In general, do not allow your pet access to the table, kitchen, or garbage can. Without rapt attention to your pet’s location, their proclivities for savory yum-yums could qualify them for a bona fide pet emergency.

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